Packaging

Packaging/BundlerSetupInTests

Enabled by default Safe Supports autocorrection VersionAdded VersionChanged

Enabled

Yes

Yes

0.4

0.5

This cop flags the require "bundler/setup" calls if they’re made from inside the tests directory.

Examples

# bad
require "foo"
require "bundler/setup"

# good
require "foo"

Packaging/GemspecGit

Enabled by default Safe Supports autocorrection VersionAdded VersionChanged

Enabled

Yes

No

0.1

0.1

Avoid using git ls-files to produce lists of files. Downstreams often need to build your package in an environment that does not have git (on purpose). Instead, use some pure Ruby alternatives, like Dir or Dir.glob.

Rationale

Packages in Debian are built in a clean environment (sbuild, schroot, et al) and whilst doing so, the build fails with:
Invalid gemspec in [<gem_name>.gemspec]: No such file or directory - git

And adding git as a dependency for each of the Ruby packaging is something that is not right and definitely not recommended. Besides, the source package consists of released tarballs (usually downloaded from GitHub/GitLab releases page or converted from the .gem file, obtained using gem fetch foo), which is extracted during build. So even if we add git as a build dependency, it would still fail as the Debian package source tree is not a git repo. Even when the package is maintained in git, it is uploaded as tarballs to the archive without any version control information.

Therefore, the only way forward here is to patch out the usage of git and use some plain Ruby alternatives like Dir or Dir.glob or even Rake::FileList whilst doing the Debian maintenance.

There’s not only Debian or other OS packaging situation/examples, but also a couple of others, for instance:

  • ruby-core as part of their CI system runs their test suite against an unpackaged Ruby tarball which doesn’t have a .git directory. That means they needed to overwrite the bundler gemspec to not use git.
    Actually, not anymore, since git has been removed from bundler’s gemspec.

  • If you build your application on a bare docker image without git, and you are pointing to a git sourced gem that uses git on its gemspec, you’ll get: No such file or directory - git ls-files (Errno::ENOENT) warnings all around. For example, if you use this in your Gemfile:
    gem "foo", git: "https://github.com/has-git-in-gemspec/foo"

Originally, git ls-files inside the default gemspec template was designed so that users publishing their first gem wouldn’t unintentionally publish artifacts to it. Recent versions of bundler won’t let you release if you have uncommitted files in your working directory, so that risk is lower.

Examples

# bad
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files         = `git ls-files`.split("\n")
  spec.test_files    = `git ls-files -- spec`.split("\n")
end

# good
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files         = Dir["lib/**/*", "LICENSE", "README.md"]
  spec.test_files    = Dir["spec/**/*"]
end

# bad
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files = Dir.chdir(File.expand_path(__dir__)) do
    `git ls-files -z`.split("\\x0").reject { |f| f.match(%r{^(test|spec|features)/}) }
  end
end

# good
require "rake/file_list"

Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files         = Rake::FileList["**/*"].exclude(*File.read(".gitignore").split)
end

# bad
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files         = `git ls-files -- lib/`.split("\n")
  spec.test_files    = `git ls-files -- test/{functional,unit}/*`.split("\n")
  spec.executables   = `git ls-files -- bin/*`.split("\n").map{ |f| File.basename(f) }
end

# good
Gem::Specification.new do |spec|
  spec.files         = Dir.glob("lib/**/*")
  spec.test_files    = Dir.glob("test/{functional,test}/*")
  spec.executables   = Dir.glob("bin/*").map{ |f| File.basename(f) }
end

Packaging/RequireRelativeHardcodingLib

Enabled by default Safe Supports autocorrection VersionAdded VersionChanged

Enabled

Yes

Yes

0.2

0.5

Avoid using require_relative with relative path to lib. Use require instead.

Rationale

Debian has a testing infrastructure that is designed to test packages in their installed form, i.e., closer to how an end-user would use it than to how a developer working against it. For this to work, the test-suite must load code that’s installed system-wide, instead of the code in the source tree. Using require_relative from the tests into the lib directory makes that impossible, but it also makes the test look less like client-code that would use the code in your gem. Therefore, we recommend that test code uses the main library code without require_relative.

Therefore, when one uses a relative path, we end up getting a LoadError, stating:
cannot load such file — /[PKGBUILDDIR]/foo.

We want to emphasize that there is nothing wrong with using require_relative inside lib/, it’s just using it from your test code to the lib directory prevents the "test the library installed system-wide" use case.

Therefore, it is still recommended to use require_relative with just this exception to it.

Examples

# bad
require_relative "lib/foo.rb"

# good
require "foo.rb"

# bad
require_relative "../../lib/foo/bar"

# good
require "foo/bar"

# good
require_relative "spec_helper"
require_relative "spec/foo/bar"

Packaging/RequireWithRelativePath

Enabled by default Safe Supports autocorrection VersionAdded VersionChanged

Enabled

Yes

Yes

0.4

0.5

This cop flags the require calls, from anywhere mapping to the "lib" directory, except originating from lib/.

Examples

# bad
require "../lib/foo/bar"

# good
require "foo/bar"

# bad
require File.expand_path("../../lib/foo", __FILE__)

# good
require "foo"

# bad
require File.expand_path("../../../lib/foo/bar/baz/qux", __dir__)

# good
require "foo/bar/baz/qux"

# bad
require File.dirname(__FILE__) + "/../../lib/baz/qux"

# good
require "baz/qux"